Wicked Fox Presents Ancient Korean Lore with a Modern Twist

Stefany Valentine Ramirez
For a majority of the book, Miyoung saw herself as a monster so she treated herself like one. She pushed others away, she fed herself with self-loathing, and she never allowed herself to feel happy. I felt like anyone Miyoung’s age could relate to her self-doubt and insecurities.

Wicked Fox by Kat Cho

Published on June 25, 2019

Published by G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers

Genres: Fairy Tales & Folklore

View on Bookshop

WICKED FOX is one part Korean fable, one part high school drama, and one part JUST KISS HIM ALREADY! Kat Cho takes an unfamiliar Korean concept and makes it relatable to Americans by immersing them in ancient Korean lore and addressing modern day issues. And of course, by sneaking in a few smooches along the way.

Gu Miyoung isn’t your typical high school student. She’s a Gumiho — a nine-tailed demon fox that sucks energy from people in exchange for immortality. Though she may have typical high school problems like a disapproving mother, a legion of jealous bullies, and exams to study for, Miyoung’s biggest problem is that she has lost her yeowu guseul — her fox bead. Without it, Miyoung cannot feast on human gi and will starve to death in 100 days.

Fortunately, there are some people who know where her yeowu guseul is and they call themselves her friends. But friendship is a new concept to someone who eats people every full moon. Miyoung has only ever seen herself as a monster and she cannot wrap her mind around the idea that anyone could love her for who she really is. Especially when a particular someone keeps giving Miyoung a reason to kiss him.

What I really loved about WICKED FOX was Miyoung’s growth from monster to human. For a majority of the book, Miyoung saw herself as a monster so she treated herself like one. She pushed others away, she fed herself with self-loathing, and she never allowed herself to feel happy. I felt like anyone Miyoung’s age could relate to her self-doubt and insecurities. But through her friendships and self-discovery, Miyoung was able to see herself as the friend, daughter, girlfriend, and bad-ass that everyone else saw her to be.

Stefany Valentine Ramirez is a Taiwanese-Texan from San Antonio. She graduated from Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi where she studied creative writing and technical/professional writing. Since then, she has worked as a social media marketer to promote books written by Zoraida Cordova, Farah Naz Rishi, Nina Varela and others. When not reading a book, Stefany can be found taking pictures for her bookstagram, camping in the wilderness, or working on her debut novel. You can follow her on Instagram or Twitter.

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